The Wife:

And so Stella was gone just as soon as she’d returned. And I was made happy. In fact, she wasn’t even as important to the flow of the episode as her boyfriend Tony was. You see, she wasn’t alone under that Dutch blue umbrella. Tony was with her. And when Ted saw them, he played it cool, all the while secretly imagining that seeing him again would bring Stella back to his door. Instead, though, it brought Tony, who thought Ted looked like a sad hot mess and wanted to help the man Stella left at the altar by offering him a job. At first, Ted turns down the offer to be an architecture professor at Columbia (although that’s insane, because, as Marshall remarks, Ted would be a great professor – he really likes to talk about architecture). Ted tells his friends he doesn’t want Tony’s help, not unless it came with a check so fat that if it sat next to you on an airplane, you’d think the check should have purchased two seats. Lo, Tony does return with such a check, but that dream, too, is ruined when Ted meets the client and realizes (in my favorite segment of the episode) the very specific laundry room in the basement the client keeps asking about is actually a murder room. (Cue Marshall totally freaking out about Ted designing “a murder house.”)

Why would you even offer to let someone work on a murder house?

Why would you even offer to let someone work on a murder house?

Eventually, Ted tells Tony that he doesn’t want his help and that he isn’t sad about Stella anymore. In fact, Ted says, why would he even want to be with someone who lies to him about her feelings and ends up leaving him at the altar for another man? Unfortunately, this makes Tony realize that maybe Stella isn’t the kind of woman he wants to be with, either, and Stella later turns up at Ted’s door in tears because Tony broke up with her. Stella apologizes to Ted for what she did to him, and begs him to help her get Tony back because, clearly, Tony listens to Ted. She tries to appeal to the romantic in him, which he cruelly reminds her she crushed when she left him. In her explanation of her relationship with Tony, though, I caught a pretty insane continuity error that makes me wonder more about the timeline of Stella’s life than Lily Van Der Woodsen’s on the Gossip Girl spin-off. Stella said she got pregnant when she was 19 and then she focused on being a mom after that. Last time I checked, Lucy was only a maximum of eight years old. (I want to say she’s actually six.) So, am I to believe Stella is 27? Certainly, I can’t because there’s no way in hell she could have gone to medical school and started a dermatology practice in that time. I’d always assumed she was about 32, and had met Tony and had her daughter while she was in med school, and since I know Lucy is not a teenager, but a sweet little girl, someone on staff made some serious continuity errors here.

Regardless, Ted doesn’t even get a chance to make the decision to help Stella or not because at that very moment, he gets a call from Barney who, after spending the episode trying to talk his way out of speeding tickets, incurring 15 in the process, gets arrested in New Jersey by a hot cop. (His inspiration? Marshall’s story about how he once talked his way out of a speeding ticket by baiting a cop with smoked bratwurst.) So Ted and Stella drive there and back to get Barney out of jail and, on the way, Ted realizes that he doesn’t want Stella to be unhappy, and agrees to talk to Tony. (He does, changes Tony’s mind, and Stella, Tony and Lucy all move out to Hollywood where Tony writes shitty hit movies like The Wedding Bride and Stella develops a successful tattoo removal clinic.) He also admits to her that he’s tired of looking for “the one. ” He knows that the right woman for him is out there somewhere, but he’s jealous of what Marshall and Lily have and what Tony and Stella have. Stella, fulfilling her duty to set Ted on his path, reminds him not to give up, as it sometimes takes us a long time to find the right person. She gives him hope, which is a nice closure for their relationship, considering she broke his damn heart earlier this season.

This wasn’t a favorite episode, and it made me really miss Lily, so I’m glad she showed up at the end for a few minutes to admit the peanut butter joke was actually kind of funny. I didn’t really like Barney’s collection of speeding tickets, although it is nice to see him fail at picking up women from time to time, which was a good payoff for a pretty hokey B-story. All in all, I feel this is kind of a “meh” episode. Maybe I was disappointed, though, because WE SHOULD BE SEEING THE FUCKING GOAT SOON. The Goat incident occurred May 8, 2009. It’s no longer May 8. I really need to hear about the events of May 8, 2009. Where is my goat story, Carter Bays and Craig Thomas? I needs it.

Funny bits:

  • YOU CAN’T DESIGN A MURDER HOUSE!
  • Ted’s ringtone is “Let’s Go to the Mall.” And mine should be, too.

The Husband:

I’ll do you one better, dear wife. My colleague at work watched the episode on CBS.com this morning, and as he considers himself a “Ted” and that Robin is his dream girl, he has already created the exact same ringtone (even with the same starting point) and e-mailed the .m4r file to me moments later to put on my brand spankin’ new iPhone. And as I am a “Marshall” and my sister considers herself a “Robin,” I shall set it to her contact.

As for me, I liked Barney’s newest version of “Wait For It”:


“Challenge accep…wait for it…” [points to Ted]